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City Of Louisville Reaches $12M Settlement With Breonna Taylor’s Family

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Breonna Taylor’s family has reached a $12M settlement with the city of Louisville after she was senselessly gunned down in her home by three members of the Louisville Metro Police Department on March 13.

General details about the settlement were first reported by the Louisville Courier-Journal, which extensively covered the case since the beginning. The settlement is the largest city payout, the Courier-Journal reports.

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The case benchmarks one of the first times police reform was bundled with a financial settlement in a case like Taylor’s and may be one of the largest.

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At a press conference on Tuesday Taylor’s family attorneys, Benjamin Crump, Sam Aguiar and Lonita Baker, discussed the details of the deal along with Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer. The monetary settlement also included several policing reforms. One requires that commanders approve all search warrants before they go to a judge, while another gives officers who decided to live within city limits a housing credit in an effort to build familiarity and trust with community members.

“We must have transparency and accountability on the work that our officers do,” Fischer said.

“Justice for Breonna is multilayered,” Taylor’s family attorney Lonita Baker began. “A financial settlement was non negotiable without significant police reform,” she continued.

Baker said Taylor’s family wants to ensure another family does not have to experience this specific heartbreak and looks forward to continuing working with on the ground organizers and elected officials for change.

A lawsuit filed in April against the city of Louisville and the LMPD by Taylor’s mother, Tamika Palmer, accused the named entities of wrongful death, saying officers were grossly negligent in their use of excessive force.

Officers Brett Hankison, Myles Cosgrove and Jonathan Mattingly, executed the botched no-knock warrant, which took the 26-year-old EMT’s life. Taylor’s boyfriend Kenneth Walker fired at officers, with the belief that Taylor’s apartment was being broken into by an intruder. He was charged with attempted murder, after his bullet struck Mattingly in the thigh. The charges were later dropped. To date none of the officers have been arrested or charged. Hankison was later fired for recklessly firing 10 rounds into Taylor’s apartment, while Cosgrove and Mattingly were placed on administrative leave.

LMPD officials claim they were alerted to Taylor’s address during a drug warrant search to arrest Taylor’s ex-boyfriend Jamarcus Glover. Police claim Glover was using Taylor’s address to traffic drug packages, but Glover has vehemently denied that Taylor was involved. No drugs were found in the apartment.

In July Glover refused a plea deal that required him to claim that Taylor was part of his drug operation.

Little movement has been made in the delayed justice for Taylor’s family, who have now waited six months after their loved ones death. Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron presides over the criminal investigation, but has received righteous frustration from Taylor’s family over the delays. After an August meeting between Cameron’s office and Taylor’s family, her family’s attorney’s announced they expected to see charges brought forth by October.

Earlier this summer, the Louisville City Council passed Breonna’s Law which banned no-knock warrants.

Breonna Taylor’s name continues to be uplifted on a daily basis in an effort to never forget the names of those whose lives were taken by police.  Last week data inspired by Taylor’s death showed that Black women are disproportionately killed by police, pointing to the many blind spots regulated by systemic racism, gender inequality and misogynoir.




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